Whitepapers

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The Quantifiable ROI For Workplace Wellness Initiatives

Most employees now spend the majority of their day at work, and 60% of American employees get health insurance coverage through an employment-based plan. In this paper we consider the measurable cost savings from workplace wellness initiatives. The risks, costs and cost savings of smoking, obesity, lack of exercise, excessive alcohol use, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, asthma and diabetes are investigated to estimate ROI for wellness programs. Statistics from the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2020 report, and data from the literature on workplace wellness programs are used to estimate costs as well as to discuss shortcomings of these costs.

in partnership with Dundalk Institute of Technology

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The Truth About Wellness ROI & the Cost of Doing Nothing

The fact that it is not always possible to specify a predictive ROI for workplace wellness programs in no way means they are not worthwhile. An abundance of evidence exists to show that comprehensive and well-run wellness programs can result in significant returns for employers. Furthermore, outcomes based programs offer a way to guarantee immediate returns and high levels of engagement. Doing nothing and expecting healthcare costs to drop is no longer an option. It is time to take action.

by Dr. Robert Grant

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Mobile and online technology: Bridging the gap to lasting behaviour change.

This article examines the potential of using mobile and online technologies as part of a workplace wellness program in order to achieve lasting changes in health-related behavior. Getting employees engaged in workplace wellness plans has the potential to lead to significant savings for employers. However, engaging employees in wellness plans and helping them make lasting changes to their health-related behaviors is a notoriously difficult thing to achieve. Recent research has shown that simply communicating unbiased information to employees, while important, is not sufficient to create the kind of changes in behavior that are needed. This white paper suggests mobile and online technology can be used as a part of a wellness program to help bridge this gap to lasting behavior change. It can do this by making the process of getting healthy simple, social and fun. Ultimately, mobile and online technology can make it easy and enjoyable for people to consistently make healthy choices. This leads to increased engagement in wellness programs, which is necessary in order to create meaningful and sustainable change in behavior

by Dr. Robert Grant